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Full text of "The frieze"

Editors Note: 



This year's FRIEZE is not much of a change from years previous. We 
decided to keep most of the sections intact but also decided to eliminate 
Intramural and Philanthropies due to the lack of photographs. The making of 
this issue was no easy task. However putting the FRIEZE together was very 
enjoyable despite the endless hours stressing about money and the artwork 
involved in the book. We hope that everyone enjoys sifting through the 
numerous pictures and articles to find their friends, enemies and 
acquaintances from the past, present and future. 

SPECIAL THANKS TO: 

To all of the FRIEZE representative's for their time and patience in helping to 
make this years book such a success. 

To Jay Harkey at Colorcraft for all of his help. 

To FAZ for helping design the cover and section dividers. 

To the Mighty Mighty Bosstones for their inspiration in the cover art. 

To all of the College Park merchants whom advertised in this year's book. 

To Flavor Flav, Snoop Dogg, Marky Mark, Mike Tyson and Don King for 
their special appearances in this year's FRIEZE. 

To the Greek community as a whole for their support and encouragment. 



WE COULD NOT HAVE DONE IT WITHOUT YOU! 



Brian Lochhead 



Rachel Kopelman 




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|New changes in rush urge 
equality among sororities 



By David Breen 



In an attempt to dispel stereotypes and encourage 
broader involvement, the Panhellcnic Association's 
*| executive board has decided to change this year's pro- 
2 cedure for sorority rush. 

J The primary aim of the changes is to equalize the 
process, so that no one house has an unfair advantage in 
attracting new members. 

The principal change is the elimination of lawn 
dances, in which sorority members perform on the front 
lawn of their houses when the rushees arrive. 

According to Gina Jun, the head of rush public rela- 
tions for the executive board, the change was made lor 
two main reasons. First, larger houses had a distinct 
advantage over small ones because they could put on a 
more impressive show. 

With the changes, "everyone would be on the same 
footing," said Jun. a member of Gamma Phi Beta. "This 
is going to help the smaller chapters." 

According to Jeanne Marie Iorio, rush chairwoman 
for Alpha Delta Pi, the changes will help all 16 houses. 
"With so few girls going throuch rush now. evervone 



acquainted. Jun said. 

Metfie ste RUSH, Page 3 



RUSH 



minority enrollment, the sororities 
are now attempting to diversify and 
recruit more minorities. 

"I think a lot of people have a 
stereotypical image of sorority 
girls," said Jun, who is Korean- 
American. They don't seem as 
diversified as the fraternities." 

Sororities are trying to raise sen- 
sitivity to make minority women 
feel more welcome, Jun said. 

"We're trying to cater more to 
scholarship and leadership skills, 
which often get overlooked in soror- 
ities." she said. 

Rush Expo begins today on 
Hornbake Library Mall. Tables will 
be set up and women can sign up 
today and tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 
3 p.m. 




n 



iMore than 450 rushees 
receive PHC sorority bids 



By Alex Knott 



Cheers and screams echoed 
through the .Student Union's Colony 
Ballroom yesterday as new pledges 
received their sorority bids. 

Though yesterday s PanHcllenic 
Council (PHC) bid was to start at 1 
p.m., anxious rushees ran in 10 min- 
utes earlv to pick up their chapter 
bids. 

The bids were distributed by their 
rush counselors. The counselors 
were chosen by PHC from each of 
the 16 campus sororities. 

Nearly 500 students poured into 
the room during the three-hour 
meeting of envelope ripping and 
emotional outbursts. 

According to Terry Zacker, direc- 
tor of Greek life, 647 students par- 
ticipated in the pre-rush festivities. 
Of those, 155 decided not to rush. 
"Across the country, fall rush num- 
s were down; we're happv to say 



through sorority rush together. By 

then matched up by computer to 
Under this new process of group 

bids coincided with many student's 
first choice according to Zacker. 
The new system was very success- 
ful, according to Dana Loewenste'in. 
PHC president. 

"I think this is something that 
should definitely continue in the 
future. Not only was the 



PanHellenic Council h 



their rush directors. 




cJTie gisters oj ^fpha Qh'x O mc g a 
proudTy present their 1993 
c \e\v ^\cmber C^ ss 



Amy Rozek 
Carolyn Rychcik 
Lisa Schlenker 
Allison SchoHck 
Kara Silber 
Elana Smiih 
Liz Smith 
Meredith Sobel 
Flo Sturla 
Eden Wolland 
Stephanie Gutndge Julie Zuckerman 



Traci Hill 
Andrea Kirsner 
Stephanie I a ons 
Kim Lytell 
Thersa Massinase 
Chrissy Miller 
Nicole Musher 
Kristen Nodzon 
Teresa Oxendine 
Melissa Poss 



Con^ratufations on your bifl sisters 

- ( \oyc the ^istcrs of 



J. 



The Sisters of 
ALPHA OMICRON PI 

u/ould like to congratulate the 

1993 PLEDGE CLASS 



Cristin Armbruster 
Erin Barcus 
Karen Dorr 
Candice Dunston 
Michelle Farrell 
Cyndi Fernandez 

Lauren Fox 
Heather Friedland 
Sarah Goodridge 
Susan Heilman 
Uzma Husain 
Kathy Keller 
Kim Koontz 
Marcy Lukaszewicz 
Suzanne Mentz 



We w/ould also like to thank 
the brothers of 
PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

for an amazing Homecoming Week! 

a on k OIK 

1st Place Overall 





Kim Orlando 
Holly Orletsky 
Lisa Owen 
Julie Peace 
Stacey Prentice 
Kelly Pyne 
Leigh Searles 
Andrea Silberman 
Rachel Smith 
Julianne Spero 
Libby Tolson 
Colette Tomayko 
Toni Toomer 
Michelle Vance 
Jennifer Yattaw 



m 



TV 




The, Sisters of Delta Delta Delta" 
are proud to announce 
their 1994 9{ezv Initiates: 



Wendy Ginsberg 
Tricia Haust 
Meighan Kellv 
Pam Kelly 
Jennifer Ken- 
Mary Lincoln 
Polly Markos 
Lara McCahan 



Amy Middleton 
Carey Migliaccio 
Kristen Murphy 
Jen Peterson 
Kerry Shahan 
Brigita Slekys 
Nicole Thurber 
Heather Vasquez 



As Will as the 1994 Tledae Class 



a Cusak 
Jessica Franken 
Kerry Knode 
Stacey Lillis 
Laura Massey 
Pamela Phipps 



Karen Schandelmeiei 
Sara Tate 
Diona Vaughan 
Melissa Vespa 
Victoria Wentz 
Marsha Yaffe 




Pledge Class 1993! 

ITB, the Sisters of Delta Gamma 





Dana Amey 


Allison Kolody 




bj ESahnsen 


Sui.dai La Greca 


1 


Sonya Bollino 


Christina Lopez 




Stacy Burke 


Sara Lough ry 




Johnna Cartwright 


Joelle Mackenzie 




Meghan Cronin 


Michelle McCracker 




Amanda Dcenis 


Valerie Meyers 




Gillian Diamond 


Tonya Monti 




Debbie Drucker 


Debra Nagan 




Marsha Dziuba 


Heather Marcum 


Katrina Fair 


Leah Pitkanen 




Cara Gerrity 


FJizabeth Plucbell 


1 
1 


Beth Goebel 


Meaggan Pollit 


Michelle Qoozman 


Chandler Ramelli 




Jennifer Grant 


Kathleen Keddy 


I 


Ashley Hammond 


Jennifer Rosen 


Jessa Jones 


Jennifer Scott 


V 


Eryn Judd 


Llena Soler 




Karen KiersarsKy 


Christine Vosswinkl 




I AG -A3E-TKE 

HOMECOMlHa 11*13 





Helping to 

create a 
special day 

By Leigh Levene 



Mote lhan 30 member, of Tau 
Kappa tpsilon fraternity volun- 
leered iheir lime Saturday at the 
Special Olympics al Archbishop 
Caroll High School in 
Washington 

Fraiernity volunteers tamed 
on their five-year tradition by 
score keeping, helping coordi- 
nate events and cheering on par- 
ticipants. 

Adam Heydt. the fraternity' i 
philanthropy chairman, said that 
members volunteer at the Special 
Olympics every year because it 
helps them give something to the 
community, as well as niJce par- 
ticipants and volunteers foel good 
about themselves. 

Events included the shot put. 
long jump, tennis ball and softball 
throws and various races, includ- 
ing wheelchair races. 

Participants included anyone 
eight years of age or older and 
"classified as being mentally 
retarded." according to Ken 
Lucas, assistant director of sports 
and coaches education for the 
Special Olympics. 




Special Olympian Tony Llgglnt try out. 



Lucas said these events served 
as a way to gel menially retarded 
people involved in sports with 
fair competition. 

would normally not be able 10 
participate," Lucas said. 

He added that these events 
were preliminaries and those who 
qualified would advance to the 
finals May 19-21 at Gallaudet 
University in Washington, where 
they may receive gold, silver or 
bronze medals. 

longer has a house. Heydt said 
they still intend to be active in 
community service "The Special 



brings the fraternity together and 
at the same time, allows the p«j- 
ticipants to have fun. compete in 
■.porting events and gain a sense 
of accomplishment." Heydt said 



win more medals lui year, his 
main goal is to have fun. "After 
26 years, most people would 
stop, but this is one time of the 

he added. 



Sororities try to 
stick together 



By Alex Knott 



Zeta 



<; !l 

■ 

Tau Alpha and Alpha Epsilon Phi sororities on 

Sorority members have expressed the desire to 
move on campus together into priority housing, 
however there is a concern that Resident Life 
will only otter them dorms in the high rises, usu- 
ally assigned to freshmen and new students. 

"My point on the whole idea of campus living 
is that originally when all of the previous |Greek| 
houses were renovated, they all got a place lo 
live together at Wicomico Hall," said Ali Walsh, 
a /eta Tau Alpha member and a junior undecid- 
ed major. 

Walsh said living together near other Greek 
houses is a priority of her sorority. 

"We were thinking of a dorm in South Hill 
like Cecil [Hall), or our next shot would be 
l.eonardtown. We don't want to be too far away 
from the row and the Graham Cracker because it 
makes us feel that we would he isolated and for- 
gotten about," she said. 

Although Resident Life has made no decision 
about where (he sorority members will live next 

cerned that the sorority members could be split 
up because of problems thai two displaced frater- 
nities caused when their members moved into 




Alpha Epsilon Phi is one of the sorority houses that 
year, displacing the members who currently live there. 



48 hours to remove their belongings and relocate 
Wicomico Hall was the surrogate housing for th 
two fraternities who were displaced when ihei 
houses went under renovation. Resident l.if 
cited "unacceptable behavior" as the reason fo 
the two fraternities' eviction. 

When Sigma Epsilon Phi and Zela Beta Tai 
fraternity houses were renovated last year, dis 



.l.'l, u 



On 



Kapp; 



not offered (he opportunity 



Stollman s;nd. "I honestly don't understand the 
mentality. 1 see more displaced people moving 
on campus if they can move together." 

No fraternity or sorority houses were renovat- 
ed this year 

Joseph Mitchell, Resident Life assignments 
manager, could not be reached for comment. 

Alpha Epsilon I'hi sorority president Deborah 
Vandersnow declined to comment following the 

A decision concerning house placement will 
be made at end of January, according lo Zeia Tau 
Alpha Housing Director Tina Bene. 

"| Mitchell | is going to go back to his dircc 
and will answer some more of our questions and 
concerns, "she said, adding that members of the, 
sororities and Resident Life will meet again 
January. 




Sororities try to 
stick together 



By Alex Knott 



.'. i ,1 ■ Mill: | • 

iei ibers h ive expressed the desire In 
move on campus together into priority housing, 
however there is ;i concern that Resident Life 
will only offer them dorms in the high rises, usu- 

"My point on the whole idea of campus living 
is that originally when all of the previous |Greek| 

i 

live together at Wicomico Hall.'" said Alt Walsh, 
a Zela Tan Alpha member and a junior undecid- 

"We were thinking ol .1 dorm 1 1 Soutl Hill 
[Hall] 01 oil 1 next shot would be 

from the row and the ( iraham ( 
makes us feel thai we would be isol 

yi ..1 members ol the 1 ireek communit; . 

.: 




Alpha Epsilon Phi is one of the sorority houses that 
year, displacing the members who currently live there. 



houses weni undci renovation 



heir belongings and rckn ale 
Resident Lift 



for 



On April 21. 1992 Sigma 

*ere ordered out ol have been fre h 



Stollman said. "I honestly don"t understand Hie 
mentality. I see more displaced people moving 
on campus if they can move together." 

No fraternity or sorority houses were renovat- 
ed this year 

Joseph Mitchell. Resident Life assignments 
manager, could not be reached for comment. 

Alpha Eipsilon Phi sorority president Deborah 
Vandersnow declined to comment following Ihe 

A decision concerning house placement will 
be made at end of January . according 10 Zeta Tau 

"| Mitchell I is going to go back to his directo 
and will answer some more of our questions and 
concerns/ she said, adding that members or thi 
sororilies and Resident Life will meet again 





Greek 101: Learning 
leadership the Greek way 



By Shana Myers 

tptttal i" tht DiamoiuOxtci 



Today marks the end of the 
first week of Greek 101 class, a 
new five-week program designed 
to educate new members of the 
campus Greek system about the 
purpose of Greek life and leader- 
ship skills. 

Dave Block, Interfraternity 
Council vice president, and 
Heather Kravitz, Panhellenic 
Associalion vice president of pro- 
gramming, decided that more pro- 
grams should be geared toward 
new members. 

"We 

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Greek leaders, and we wanted to 
develop a program to help 
pledges understand the basics," 
Block said. 

Three to five new members 
from each house were invited to 
attend one of the program's 11 



president. Campagnolo told her 
class that because she is not in 
their chapter, she can give them 
Confidential and unbiased advice. 

"The new members are the 
future of the Greek system, and 
it's important to inform them 
about what's going on so they can 
make intelligent decisions," said 
Campagnolo. 

Besides learning about the 
Greek system, Greek 101 is also a 
great way for the new members to 
build friendships with others out- 
side their chapter, she said. 

"I volunteered because I've 
been an active leader in youth 
groups, and I want to get a differ- 
ent perspective from Greek life," 
said Elana Heideman. a Delta Phi 
Epsilon pledge. 

Campagnolo pointed out that 
many members and leaders of 
campus organizations are in 



itions, including 
ment Association 
1 Mandell, who 
ipsilon Phi. 
■s require students 
>rs that attracted 



d because 
Greek or 
)r at other 
vear and 



do anything for you." 

friendship and advice, spirit, lead- 
ership, new ideas and high schol- 
arship. They learned from their 
instructor's history lesson that Phi 
Beta Kappa, founded at William 
and Mary in 1776. was the very- 
first Greek letter organization. 

At that time, freshmen were not 
allowed to rush, so the fraternities 
had prospective members sign an 
agreement promising to join in a 
year, hence the term "pledge." 

Chapters grew after the Civil 
War and continued to expand 
until the anti-establishment move- 
ment of the 1960s. Numbers rose 
again in ihe 1980s and there are 
now 26 national sororities and 62 
national fraternities. 

Class members were a.sked to 
answer the question, "What 
makes the Greek system unique?" 

The new members' answer: 
sororities and fraternities are 
probably the only groups that fol- 
low ritual and have a length of 
involvement that stretches beyond 
one's college years. 

"There has been lots of media 
interest and a great response from 
the new members taking the 
I think it's a great new program 
and if all goes well, we'll keep 
doing it." Zacker said. 




PHA honors 
two teachers 
of the year 

By Philip Kornreich 



PHA 



The 
(PHA) 



continued from Page I 
event that united faculty and stu- 
dents to celebrate pood teaching. 

"It leaves me in a feel-good type 
of mood. It's neat to hear what stu- 
dents have to say about their teach- 
ers," she said. 

Marsha Guenzler, associate 
director of Student Union and cam- 
ptis pri'ftQlTltuj 



lions to create a partnership 
between students and faculty, 

Guenzler told sorority members 
to start a faculty library, invite fac- 
ulty over for dinner, and to volun- 
teer money for faculty research. She 
urgcd teachers to teach responsibili- 
ty and to understand the differences 
in each student. "I'm a really strong 
advocate thai the best learning envi- 
ronment is where students and fac- 
ulty are engaged with each other," 
he said. 




Dawn Nichols, I'M/ 



have a cumulative GPA < 
Nichols pointed out tl 

higher average grades II 
who are not sorority men 
cumulative campus soroi 
2.9, while the campus a 
average CPA is 2.86." sh 
Heather Kravitz. PHA 
dent of programming ar 
psychology major, said n 
like last night's banqu 
occur to create a posiliv 
ship between Greeks and 
"I have seen faculty-st 
tions improve. It would 
of the chapters get 
lead of a few. Comn 
kept open. 





By Joetta Sack 



Council voted 





was losing business to other area restau- 
rants because it was not allowed to sell 
beer. He added that its new owners had 
invested more than $140,000 in renova- 
tions and were working to make it a more 
full-service restaurant. 

"One of the problems is when people 
come in to buy food, they find out he 
doesn't have beer and cancel their order." 
Daniello said. 

Daniello said the restaurant's man- 
agers had offered to post signs saying 
beer would only be sold with food so the 
restaurant would not become a "drinking 
joint." 

Several residents. including 
Councilmen-elect iVIichael Smith and 
Michael Jacobs, supported Page's 
motion. "[Denying the recommendation 
in no way inhibi 



rant I'd 
| granting 



favoring establis 
businesses. 

"We need to make it easier for small 
businesses to make a living here." said 



National board 
closes fraternity 



)y Alex Knott 



The Alpha l'.iu ( imc-.M national 
■trnity bo.ird of directors has 
Kd its campus chapter. Epsilon 
5tmma. due to iin.mci.il delinquen- 
Tkazing and alcohol violations, 
tast Thursday the national Inner 
jty put all current campus members 
» alumni stat.iv -a huh bars them 
mm being in any future campus 
Bier of Alpha Tau Omega 

JPynn Smiley, director of com- 
plications lor Alpha Tau 
Bag^'s national fraternity, said 
he decision was a " result of 
^£>oal dehncjuency. and numer- 
isk management violations 
ncludcd disregard lor the 
Bbnal fraternity's alcohol and 
Hng policy over the last 36 
Inths 

■Alpha Tau Omega] is commit- 



Alpha Tau Omega national fraterni- 
ty executive director Thomas 
Schneider. "The Eipsilon Gamma 
chapter was not willing to adhere to 
the policies that ensure that experi- 
ence. 

"We will not continue operating a 
chapter when it is not upholding the 
high principles and ideals of Alpha 
Tau Omega," Schneider said. 

This marks the second fraternity 
this semester that has received puni- 
tive action from its national fratcmi- 
ly due to financial problems. 

Earlier this year. Pi Kappa Alpha 
was suspended indefinitely by its 
national fraternity for financial and 
housing problems. 

Though the Interfraternity 
Council (IFC) has lost two fraterni- 
ties this year. IFC president David 
Stollman said the Greek system is 



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fer 8*3 I 1.1 a ft 



n 
r 
o 

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in 





) SWPSON-Th. OwmMO 

Aaron Martin of the campus police shoots over his opponents. 

Greeks victorious 
in Clash with cops 

Hoops game earns 
money for charity 



By EdwartTWatls* 

Greek Week started on a high 
note for campus fraternities and 
sororities, with the Greek Ail 
stars slam dunking the campui 
police in thi second annual bas- 
ketball Clash at Cole," 68-62. 

The game raised $4,559 in 
ticket s;les for the AIDS 
Response Fund, which assists 
faculty, staff and students infect- 
ed by AIDS or HTV 



about 800 watciied its te 
throughout the first hal 
late surge by Lhi police 
score. 30-30, at halftime 
The police's only lea 
early in the second half 



lead 



as the Greeks then pulled away 
for the victory. 

Greek guard Tim McAveney, 
a member . of S^gma, Alpha 
' Hpsilon'frarefMry, who'scored a 
team-high 22 points, bit a key 
three-pointer to cool a second- 
half police comeback. 

Police guard Subrena Rivers, 
a former Terrapin women's bas- 
ketball player, then missed two 
free throws with about two min- 
utes remaining in the game. On 
the next play she fouled 
McAveney, who hit one of two 



McAveney again as he pu< 
the ball through heavy pres> 
He buried both free throw 




m 




Pa ge , 

" K " ,b ""na u &J., " ° ach and a 

s, » Vantage a. ,^„ ? , r ?' ««« 
rv ■ Centers M,£ R f y ° ^ v,c, °- 

t Pni Gamma Delta L, mber o{ 



Sgi. Paul n-,; m Befo " 'he 
•° organize f J'*^ 

bu « *«• year Zm, . J**' bare '* 
The AlS^' ^ 




The Untouchables 



I 



IFC 






Intertraternity Council 






Kxecutive Officers 

J — //vwV' VA- VI V V/ lxlvvl O 






Fall 1994 -Spring 1995 






President Karl Park 


B0n 




V.P. Internal Affairs Faz Besharatian 


SN 




V.P. External Affairs Matt Zucker 


TKE 




V.P. Finance Justin Benesch 


ZOE 




V.P. Administrative Affairs Brian Lochhead 


IN 




V.P. Academic Affairs Brian Graime 


SOE 




V.P. Risk Management Brandon Newlands 


0X 




V.P. Recruitment Ken Ulman 


0X 






The Brothers of 




Would like to thank (insert name here) 
Wish you the best in (insert event here) 

„ ev g * — » * an 






L 




OOP- 



p Ron -r ^ fbfedf op 




James Chappelear Cico Silva 



KRISTIN 
U0R1 



JENNY 



AD &1£NNE 

TEN 






Neil Hyman Keith Caruso 




T07MI6HT 



Chad Smith David Shapiro 



VANTINE 
STUDIOS INC. 



FOR YOUR COMPOSITE NEEDS 

#1 IN QUALITY, SERVICE & 
INTEGRITY 
Since 1937 

When it is composite time think - Vantine. Ask your 
National Headquarters about us. We're the world's 
first and most re putable composite company. 

Why? 

- Delivery clause in the body of our contracts. We Deliver! 

- Representatives to assist you in all phases of the 
operation. 

- Follow up after the composite is delivered. 

- A friendly staff ready to assist you with your questions. 



If you're ready for a positive change, call or write 

today! 



Box 336 

Hamilton, NY 13346 
(315) 824-3200 -(Inside NY) 
Toll Free 1-800-448-8484 



The 5>s4er5 O-f 

AAA 

OJiSh +he gradua + incj 
'^^^ S> en lcr 3 cpod luck?! 

jp* VJc V You ! 

' Dam Jannr, b T. 
Room £ob,n Cq^Y 

JenW Abigail Mar,a 
Chri^ HiWer Ckt <^> Mi 1)5 




D e 1 1 1 

P^^M 5 ' ^ ^^^^^^^ I 










The brothers of 1 

would liroHS wish ^ 

1 the best of luck M J*> 
^ to our graduating ^-^J 

AnHriu?iTLrTony Carreras 
/X ^ L er ? er Dave Stollman 

Mike Schafer ^stJonsM 
Chris Doherty J asonSt > 6 | 

Scoff Ancfersos?^ V N 
_ ^ 1 







4 



FU 




PHI GAMMA DELTA 



~5tni ors-^y 




A sorority. . . 
to Know friendship, 
belonging, i ndiv/duali'ty, 
and involvement 




Known throughout the nation as the 
gentlemans fraternity, Phi Delta Theta's 
Maryland Alpha Chapter exemplifies this 
description. Through athletics, art, dance, 
and especially scholarship. Phi Delts reign 
supreme among Greek houses. Our close 
personal relationships with Greek life 
directors, alchohol policy constructors and 
judicial board members makes Phi Delt the 
cog that runs the machine of the Greek system. 
We sing, we dance, we create; we are - 

Phi Delta Theta! 




6000 ^CX*£'u. MISS YOU ' 



b«Ca MwtT ftKr jeNw Kltis-TV 



CONGRATULATION^ 
G£ADU*TltJ6 SENIORS 




BETA THETA f=KL 
John Ohlu Xoc Cohci\ 
£-te*c Me^z. Sid A b rams 
J'oKti OJellcntxfS Sieve Scij-fh 
Matt Dirki€N M*tt Nq^«n 
(Jordan §ol<Jlstein 



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\] □ rv^, I J I /UN 

Southern i 

aEilTLEMEKi 

op 





GOOD LUCK AND 
FAREWELL 
SENIORS!! 



Rhine 
Muther 
Park 

Monticello 

Scheuerman 

Cochran 

Van Cleave 

Catalla 

Brackley 

Goodf riend 



McDonnell Mosley 
Kirby R. Tallant 

J. Iorio 
C. Drake 
Raines Everett 



1 



Whitfill 
Mai 

Winkler 
Parren 
We stover 



Hayes 
Hampsey 
Longley 
Goldstein 



I 



583 



High Quality At Great Rates! 



T-SHIRTS • JERSEYS • CAPS • APRONS 
• SWEATS • TOTES & MORE 



Serving 

Clubs • Sororities • Fraternities • Business • Teams • Schools 



SILKSCREENING • EMBROIDERY 
• ART DEPARTMENT 



We Offer / Free Delivery ✓ Free Estimates 
✓ Free Brochure ✓ Group Discounts 

WE DO IT RIGHT -WE DO IT FAST 



Balfour House 




To the graduating Seniors 
of Kappa Delta, 



" We wish for you to have 
beautiful experiences 
each new day 
as you follow 
your dreams." 

Cove in AO% 
The Sisters of Kappa Delta 



AX 

IT'S BETTER 

THAN BAD 

XT'! 

GOODS 





^ 00T 

For you'll ^ alo^Q \\4t^ 3 d<S 



arvfu lotions Seniors! 




"Pops" Embmeyer's 
southern fried chicken 
cajun style barbeque pit. 
Open 7 days a week 
9:00am-2:00am for all 

your bbq needs. 
Bring in this ad for a 
free order of baked beans 
and a kiss from "pops" 
(women only)with any entree. 

9522 51st Ave. 

779-34S0 



'« dont gat heart barn, name airf pops/. 
Pops E&meytr 




Congratulations 
"To Our 
Seniors I 

Veil Miss You 



HAPPY 60* 

BIRTHDAY 





CONGRATULATIONS 
TO ALL OF THE 
GRADUATING' 
8 GREEKS. 
GOOD LUCK! 
AND REMEMBER, 
ITS A PLAID, PLAM 



PLAID,PLAID 
I WORLD! 



+■ 



y 

The international Studio 



FRATERNAL 
COMPOSITE 
SERVICE, INC 



College Photographers 

SINCE 1954 

COAST TO COAST 

169 CAMPBELL AVE. 
UTICA, N.Y. 13502 
PHONE 315-733-0593 
TOLL FREE 1-800-448-9305 



THE 



TERRAPIN CLOTHESPIN 



The Ultimate 
Source For 
Authentic Greek 
Items & Apparel,,, 




CLOTHESPm 






o Fraternity/ 
Sorority jewelry 

° Party Favors 

o Athletic Clothing 

o Gifts 

o Plaques 

o Glassware 

° Stickers 

o Gift Wrap 

o Paddles/Mugs 

o T-shirts 

o Sweatshirts 

o Decals 

o Ribbons 

o Stationary 

o Key Chains 

o Pennants 

o Plastics 

o Balloons 



7408 Baltimore Blvd. o College Park, MD 20740 o (301)779-7766 



SORORITY DIRECTORY 



Alpha Chi Omega 


4525 College Ave. 


864-7044 


Alpha Delta Pi 


4535 College Ave. 


864-8146 


Alpha Epsilon Phi 


No. 1 1 Fraternity Row 


927-9701 


Alpha Omicron Pi 


4517 College Ave. 


927-9871 


Alpha Phi 


7402 Princeton Ave. 


927-0833 


Alpha Xi Delta 


4517 Knox Rd. 


927-1384 


Delta Delta Delta 


4604 College Ave. 


277-9720 


Delta Gamma 


4518 Knox Rd. 


864-2171 


Delta Phi Epsilon 


4514 Knox Rd. 


864- 9692 


Gamma Phi Beta 


No. 9 Fraternity Row 


403-4308 


Kappa Alpha Theta 


7407 Princeton Ave. 


927-7606 


Kappa Delta 


4610 College Ave. 


779-0847 


Phi Sigma Sigma 


4531 College Ave. 


403-4306 


Sigma Delta Tau 


4516 Knox Rd. 


864-8803 


Sigma Kappa 


No. 1 Fraternity Row 


927-6244 


Zeta Tau Alpha 


No 12. Fraternity Row 


864-9436 


FRATERNITY DIRECTORY 




Alpha Epsilon Pi 


1211L Stamp Union 


314-8344 


Beta Theta Pi 


No. 6 Fraternity Row 


314-5282 


Delta Chi 


4431 Lehigh Rd. No.239 


779-7092 


Delta Sigma Phi 


4300 Knox Rd. 


927-9770 


Delta Tau Delta 


No. 3 Fraternity Row 


314-7008 


Kappa Alpha 


No. 1 Fraternity Row 


405-9085 


Phi Delta Theta 


4605 College Ave. 


277-9706 


FIJI 


7501 Hopkins Ave. 


864-9398 


Phi Kappa Sigma 


No. 5 Fraternity Row 


314-5306 


Phi Kappa Tau 


7404 Hopkins Ave. 


927-7587 


Phi Sigma Kappa 


No. 7 Fraternity Row 


314-5259 


Pi Kappa Phi 


No.8 Fraternity Row 


927-2157 


Sigma Alpha Epsilon 


No. 4 Fraternity Row 


314-7766 


Sigma Alpha Mu 


No. 2 Fraternity Row 


314-0155 


Sigma Chi 


4600 Norwich Rd. 


699-9397 


Sigma Nu 


4617 Norwich Rd. 


277-7592 


Sigma Phi Epsilon 


No. 13 Fraternity 


927-4437 


Tau Epsilon Phi 


4607 Knox Rd. 


864-9513 


Tau Kappa Epsilon 


1 21 1L Stamp Union 


864-5593 


Theta Chi 


7401 Princeton Ave. 


779-9715 


Zeta Beta Tau 


No. 14 Fraternity Row 




Zeta Psi 


7403 Hopkins Ave. 


779-3750